Halo Infinite
Microsoft | 343 Industries

Halo: Infinite Reviews Are In, and Critics Love It

Halo is back with a bang. Early review for Infinite's single-player campaign are in, and critics love it. The Chief is back!
Author
Article Tags
Share
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on reddit
Share on pinterest
The Latest
Tonic Topics
Join the Convo on Facebook!

Halo: Infinite comes out tomorrow, and fans have high expectations for the newest installment in the legendary shooter series. The previous entry, Halo 5: Guardians, was divisive among fans for its bland storyline, rote gameplay, and lack of passion. Infinite is hitting the scene six years after 5’s release, the longest gap between mainline entries in the series since Halo: Combat Evolved launched in November 2001.

Early reviews for Infinite’s single-player campaign are in, and reviewers are impressed. These pre-release impressions indicate that the game is a return to form for the beloved franchise. What’s more, the roughly 20-hour campaign will be on GamePass, too. Does Microsoft finally have its first killer app of the new console generation?

Back to Basics

Halo: Infinite starts by streamlining things. Halo 5 was a narrative mess, following two storylines that ultimately went nowhere. Infinite opens after a considerable jump forward in time, leaving Spartan Locke and his insufferable fireteam in the past. The game focuses on Master Chief and two new characters. The first is an AI called The Weapon, and the second is an “average Joe” ally called The Pilot.

The Pilot offers an everyman’s perspective for the game’s larger-than-life battles and helps remind series protagonist Master Chief that regular people rely on him. Infinite’s story focuses on this core trio of characters, developing their dynamic throughout the story.

The Central Hook

Halo has big shoes to fill in making sure we do it right. I think we did a good job on the Halo 4 campaign. [But] we didn’t stay true to what Halo is with gameplay for multiplayer, and fans rightly called us on that. With Halo 5, […] while I think the gameplay is good, it didn’t feel like a Halo campaign. In multiplayer, we learned our lesson from 4 and really focused on the right feel for a Halo multiplayer.

Halo has big shoes to fill in making sure we do it right. I think we did a good job on the Halo 4 campaign. [But] we didn’t stay true to what Halo is with gameplay for multiplayer, and fans rightly called us on that. With Halo 5, […] while I think the gameplay is good, it didn’t feel like a Halo campaign. In multiplayer, we learned our lesson from 4 and really focused on the right feel for a Halo multiplayer.

Bonnie Ross, 343 Industries founder, in an interview with Polygon

Fans of Just Cause rejoice: Halo finally has a grappling hook. The introduction of the grappling hook is easily the best thing about Infinite. Zipping around the map with the grappling line and pummeling enemies couldn’t be more fun. The game drops players on a new Halo installation, Zeta Halo, and introduces them to a slew of new weapons. Classic Halo enemies like Grunts and Brutes are back, but 343 Industries has overhauled the tools you use to battle foes.

After the introductory missions early in the story, Infinite unleashes players on the sprawling open world of Zeta Halo. This game is the first Halo that has allowed players free reign to explore a true sandbox. Earlier entries in the franchise showed a penchant for emergent gameplay thanks to the wide variety of weapons and vehicles available for the player. Infinite embraces this open-ended structure, expanding it to the game’s overarching design.

Is it Fun?

Combat in the Halo games has always been front-and-center. This entry is no different. Players can expect to tackle countless enemy strongholds in varied terrain. Fights can break out in rivers or within claustrophobic tunnels. Sometimes, players need to attack problems from a new angle to find a winning strategy.

Is there a Banished base on a mountaintop that you can’t clear out? Try hijacking a flying Banshee vehicle and get the drop on your opponents from the skies. Lenticular solutions yield dynamic fights and unpredictable outcomes.

The bottom line is that Halo: Infinite isn’t just the best game of the year. It’s one of the best Halo games ever made. Xbox players have already logged hundreds of hours in the game’s multiplayer mode, which surprisingly launched three weeks early on November 15. Now, longtime Halo fans can sink their teeth into a meaty new single-player campaign that corrects Halo 5’s biggest missteps and puts the franchise back where it belongs: at the top of everyone’s “must-play” list.